Trump’s State of the Union Address 2020

Back to Article
Back to Article

Trump’s State of the Union Address 2020

AP

AP

AP

Kassidy Haggard, National and World News

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






This past Tuesday, only a day before President Trump’s impeachment trial was supposed to take place,  he spoke to Congress in a joint session. However, Trump’s speech has been receiving some backlash, as he was said to have exaggerated some of the things he mentioned. Several new websites such as The New York Times and The Washington Post have published articles “fact-checking” statements made by Trump.

In his speech, Trump said, “I am thrilled to report to you tonight that our economy is the best it has ever been.” While this sounds promising, looking at a few statistics can prove this statement to be untrue. From 1997 to 1999, the annual growth rate of the economy was an average of 4.56 percent, but the growth rate has never been above three percent with Trump in office. Moreover, the unemployment rate while Trump has been in office was 3.5 percent at its lowest, but in 1953 was 2.5 percent at its lowest.

Trump also brought up  a mostly true fact concerning drug death rates into the conversation stating, “Drug overdose deaths declined for the first time in nearly 30 years.” There is no denying that the overdose rates did fall in 2018, but that was only after the deaths due to overdose reached the highest it has been in American history.

Since February of 2017, around 6.7 million jobs have been created. While it might not seem significant to some, Trump’s over-exaggeration of the number of jobs produced bothers others. In his speech, he said, “Since my election, we have created seven million new jobs.” What bothers many is while many new jobs have been created, it falls short of the seven million marks, and some people find this misleading. 

Trump has also exaggerated the amount of Americans who are now “off of food stamps” because of “[his] administration”. Trump claims the number is seven million, but in reality, it’s closer to 6 million since February of 2017. While there is no way to deny this number is great, some experts have said the large number could be due to the immigrant families of American citizen children being fearful of Trump’s administration’s policies when it comes to immigration. This has caused many of these families to quit the program.

Nothing Trump said was completely false, but few things were completely truthful. While the majority of the facts were correct, Trump often twisted numbers higher than they are in reality and tended to forget to add context in some of the statements he made in his speech.